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News

While You Were Studying: Trending Stories

As you continue to procrastinate studying for midterms, you scroll through your News Feed and see a news article shared by your friends. It’s not about the upcoming election or even world news in general, but a topic that just isn’t worth taking time out of your 15-minute social media break. In an effort to keep you up to date with trending news while giving you enough Instagram time, here is a quick roundup of the top stories of the week so far.

1. Sorry Prince Harry, your journey to the throne just got longer. The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have named their daughter Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana of Cambridge, born Saturday, May 2, 2015. She is the fourth in line to the throne after her grandfather, father and brother – which you can see in this nifty little map.

2. Holy guacamole! You just saved some money in your extremely tight college student budget. Chipotle just released its famous “guac is extra” recipe.

3. If you had any presence on social media Monday, you would know that Vogue’s annual Costume Institute Gala took place. This $25,000-per-ticket fundraiser takes place at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and all in attendance wore their Monday best, from Sarah Jessica Parker’s surprisingly elegant H&M gown to Beyonce’s near-nude sparkling dress.

4. Miley Cyrus dyed her armpit hair pink. You know you want to click this.

5. Here’s a feel-good story for you. During the Boston Marathon, the women at Wellesley College traditionally offer kisses to the runners. One runner, Barbara Tatge, was dared by her daughter to kiss a handsome man during her run as she ran through the town of Wellesley. Needless to say, the photo went viral and the search for the anonymous man began. Of all people, the man’s wife responded, ending the search. The couple wished to remain anonymous, however, and there were no bumps in the marriage because the wife knew it was just for good fun.

So now, you will be able to contribute a little to the small talk around school while still getting that A on your dreaded midterm. You’re welcome.

 

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News

What We Learned from Relay for Life 2015

This past weekend, UCLA held yet another successful Relay for Life. For those of you who may not be familiar, Relay for Life is a 24-hour event in which teams of participants relay continuously around an area (in our case, the track at Drake Stadium) to come to together against cancer and to spread awareness of the disease. Each team works to fundraise a goal amount beforehand and even during the event, and all of the proceeds go towards cancer research and the American Cancer Society. The 24 hours were also packed with games and entertainment, so there was really never a dull moment. Participating in my first-ever Relay made me realize just how symbolic and educational this event really was.

Cancer does not discriminate. 

This powerful phrase was repeated multiple times throughout Relay. Anybody can get cancer, regardless of race, sex or any other defining characteristics. Furthermore, it doesn’t necessarily matter if you’re predisposed or not. Many people develop cancer based on lifestyle choices rather than a genetic predisposition – both can be factors. During the closing ceremony, one of the education chairs from Colleges Against Cancer held an exercise in which she asked members of the audience to stand up if they did certain things regularly (such as smoking or using sunscreen) to demonstrate the ways in which our lifestyle choices could increase or decrease our likelihood of getting cancer.

Sometimes when one person has cancer, it can feel like the whole family has cancer. 

One of the speakers during the Luminaria portion of Relay said this during her speech, and these words really stuck with me. This isn’t to downplay the brutality of having cancer for the patient or even to say that his or her family is experiencing the same pain. Instead, this speaker was implying that the families of cancer patients also feel the aftershocks of this pain. The family members (and friends too) that stand by a loved one battling cancer are known among the Relay community as “caregivers.” Caregivers are the ones who drive their patient to their countless doctors’ appointments, accompany them through the difficult experience of chemotherapy and ultimately provide a shoulder to cry on in times of sadness.

You can greatly diminish your risk for cancer by choosing a healthy lifestyle.

Believe it or not, cancer is in many ways a preventable illness. Certain habits like smoking cigarettes (also hookah or electronic cigarettes), using tanning beds and drinking above a normal limit of one standard drink per day can increase your risk for different forms of cancer including lung cancer, skin cancer and mouth cancer. Conversely, healthy habits such as daily exercise and maintaining a healthy diet high in antioxidants have been proven to decrease your risk for the disease. One of the main focuses at Relay was to illustrate this idea through signs lining the track, posters at the different booths and various speeches.

As much as Relay for Life was a fun and packed 24 hours, it was also a time for reflection on just how ruthless cancer can be. It was a time to remember those lost to cancer, to honor the survivors and current fighters and to applaud the people who stood by and continue to stand by their sides. Most importantly, it was an opportunity to come together as a community towards one common goal: celebrating more birthdays.

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Campus news

Mojo Asks Students: Racist Stickers on Campus

Editor’s note: Some of the images included in this post contain explicit language. We have decided to run these images because we felt it appropriate to thoroughly cover this campus incident.

Racist stickers referencing Freddie Gray appeared around campus and on the Afrikan Student Union’s bulletin board on Thursday, and students quickly denounced the stickers on Facebook and by marking the stickers themselves. Many students said that the situation was reflective of poor campus climate, and some added they felt it is an issue the Undergraduate Students Association Council should address. Here are some student thoughts:

 

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“If they attack the black community at UCLA, they are attacking everyone at UCLA. We stand together as one whole family. If they attack on family, they attack all of us.” – first-year molecular, cell and developmental biology student Rubi Gomez

 

“I saw one of the stickers and my first reaction was being upset because I don’t think they understand the full institutionalized consequences. The problem is not ‘if you follow the law, you’d be alive’ but more of a targeted race issue. Also, being anonymous makes it a hate crime and it’s clearly an attack.” – fifth-year geography and English student Kristen Chan

 

“If only Freddie Gray had followed the damn law, he’d still be alive.” (Jessica Zhou/Daily Bruin)

 

“We go to a school that is not very politically active. Maybe at Berkeley people would be more motivated about this. … The only thing people got upset about was the tuition hikes, and then we went on break and then everyone forgot about it.” – first-year undeclared student Eleanor Hunts

 

“A lot of things with anti-Semitism have been going on around campus, and we’re known for our racially diverse campus so it’s disturbing to see that we have come to this level. I feel like it opens your eyes to certain things you didn’t truly understand the extent of.” – second-year sociology student Leah Falcon

 

“They are not peaceful protestors. They are uncivilized, violent criminals. #ShootAllLooters” (Jessica Zhou/Daily Bruin)

 

“It’s not shocking people feel that way because there are racist people everywhere. It’s the fact they go to the lengths to do that that shocks me. As a UCLA student it makes me rethink the whole ‘picture perfect public school with lots of diversity’ image we try so hard to attain.” – first-year psychology student Brian Green

 

“It’s disgusting, and in general this issue doesn’t just affect the group being targeted. It affects everyone. Seeing things like this makes me question humanity but also forces me to rethink about the ‘educated’ people we are surrounded by in a high profile university.” – first-year business economics student Devanshi Mehta

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Arts & EntertainmentNews

A Look Back at Dance Marathon

This weekend marked UCLA’s 14th annual Dance Marathon. This event, put on by the Pediatric AIDS Coalition, is a 26-hour-long dance marathon where students take a literal stand against pediatric HIV/AIDS. Let’s take a look back at the original story published by the Daily Bruin on April 12, 2002.

First of all, this story was barely on the front page, and mostly carried on to page three. This is in stark contrast to the current Daily Bruin focus on Dance Marathon and really shows how the event has grown so much bigger over the years. The story opens with, “On your mark, get set, DANCE!” – nothing’s really changed there. The enthusiasm for Dance Marathon that you see on campus today is definitely seen in this first story and the first Dance Marathon.

This first Dance Marathon began with 190 students, and “members of the Interfraternity and Panhellenic Councils collaborated with the Undergraduate Students Association Council, Student Alumni Association and On Campus Housing Council.” There was not a Pediatric AIDS Coalition way back in 2002. It also began as a way for the Greeks to become more involved. 

Dance Marathon co-chair at the time, Emily Whichard, anticipated that this “could be a huge tradition on campus – a unifying thing for a campus that needs that.”

Dance Marathon originally began as a way to unify UCLA as a campus and to get people involved in the community working towards a common goal.

In 2014, Dance Marathon had to be moved to Pauley Pavilion to account for the increase in participating students and the enormity of the event. During the past 13 Dance Marathons, an overall $3,917,480 has been raised for the cause. It truly has become a campus tradition.

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News

What Did You #askUCLA?

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UCLA admissions were released at the start of this month and a record number of more than 112,000 students applied for the 2015-2016 academic year. That might explain why there has been an overwhelming amount of touring students and families on campus, making it impossible for me to squeeze in a quick lunch at Ackerman Student Union.

Earlier this month, UCLA’s official Twitter account hosted a live Twitter chat which allowed admitted freshmen to ask any questions about life and academics at UCLA with the hashtag #askUCLA. People made hundreds of tweets, but a certain few stuck out as quite memorable this year.

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I have been asking myself that same question every day since becoming a student here.

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Really funny @UCLA, really funny. Playing with our emotions like that.

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Tommy is still waiting for a reply.

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I thought some real shade was being thrown here, but it’s OK. All is good.

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I have a feeling she isn’t a new student.

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OK, he most definitely is not new here.

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And well, this guy.

With that, congratulations to all the baby Bruins that have been admitted this year! I’m sure they all will have many more questions once they start in the fall, so let’s welcome them with open arms.

 

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